Lesson Plan 6: Who Climbs Everest

Welcome to part 6 of the Expedition 8848 Education Programme Lesson Plans! These lesson plans have been made for teachers, educators and scout leaders to use in their classrooms to teach students about climate change and exploration.

The sixth lesson plan is about the mountaineers that climb Everest and what qualities can help them succeed.

The lesson plan 6 – Who Climbs Everest can be downloaded here: http://expedition8848.com/lesson-plans/06-MW-LessonP6.pdf

Click here to access all the lesson plans: http://expedition8848.com

Click here to access more resources for this lesson and all the lesson plans on OneNote: https://1drv.ms/o/s!AvIvIB5FrRB2rmQQsl_tJ87xwOvk

Lonely Planet Kids: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/kids/

LP-Kids-Logo_2019

 

Space Exploration Lesson Plan 1: The Origin of the Moon

As part of the Expedition 8848 Education Programme, we present the first of 10 mini lesson plans on the theme of space exploration in collaboration with the People’s Moon Project.

This lesson is centred on the history of the moon and its formation.

The Space Lesson Plan 1 – Origin of the Moon can be downloaded here: http://expedition8848.com/lesson-plans/11-MLP1%20The%20Origin%20of%20the%20Moon.pdf

Click here to access all the lesson plans: http://expedition8848.com

Click here to access more resources for this lesson and all the lesson plans on OneNote: https://1drv.ms/o/s!AvIvIB5FrRB2rmQQsl_tJ87xwOvk

And for more information on the People’s Moon Project click here to visit their website: https://thepeoplesmoon.com

 

Introduction to the Space Exploration Lesson Plans

If you’ve been following our regular lesson plans you’ve been learning all about climate change, global exploration and the history of Mount Everest. We are excited to announce that in addition to our main lesson plans, we have created 10 extra mini lesson plans on the subject of the moon and space exploration in collaboration with the People’s Moon Project in order to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing!

In the video below you’ll meet Olivia from the Expedition 8848 Education Team who will be introducing these lesson plans.

Click here to access all the lesson plans: http://expedition8848.com

Click here to access more resources for this lesson and all the lesson plans on OneNote: https://1drv.ms/o/s!AvIvIB5FrRB2rmQQsl_tJ87xwOvk

Olympic Gold Medal and Frozen Spaghetti

By George Manley – Expedition 8848 Artist

Everest Historical Moments Series

3 Olympic Gold

In 1922 the first full expedition to climb Everest was undertaken, arriving before the monsoon, with superior food, but still with inadequate clothing and equipment. Although the food supplies were greatly improved, famously and to the disappointment of everyone, much of it froze solid, including the tins of spaghetti.

In spite of the intense cold, bad clothing and frozen spaghetti, helped along with hot tea and oxygen bottles George Finch (Australian), Geoffrey Bruce (British) and Teibir Bura (Nepal) reached the highest point that any human had ever achieved of 8230m/27,300ft. 

2 Olympic Gold

This was celebrated as a great success back in Britain, two years later during the 1924 winter Olympics in France, all the team members were awarded the Olympic Gold Medal. But because many of the team awarded these medals had left on 1924 expedition to Everest, Edward Strutt accepted the medal on their behalf and at the closing ceremony, Strutt pledged that these Gold medals would be taken on the next expedition to the summit of Everest.  

1 Olympic Gold 4

Because of this disastrous and fateful 1924 expedition, his pledge faded away, until 2010 when this pledge was rediscovered by a Kenton Cool an experienced Himalayan mountaineer.

Kenton Cool obtained permission and to the delight of the descendants of the 1922 Everest team, he fulfilled this pledge and took the Olympic Gold Medal to the summit of Everest, the same year Britain hosted the 2012 London Olympics and exactly 90 years but one day after the three 1922 Everest team members reached 8230m/27,300ft.

4 Olympic Gold

Renewable Energy

By George Drayson – Expedition 8848 Education Team

Climate Science Series

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.00.39

What is Renewable Energy?

Renewable Energy, also known as clean energy, is energy made from resources that will never run out, like wind, water and sunlight. It is a clean form of energy because it doesn’t deplete the earth’s resources and at the same time doesn’t pollute our atmosphere. This is the opposite of coal, oil and natural gas.

What are the 5 main types of Renewable Energy?

Solar

Light consists of small particles called photons. When electrons absorb photons, it causes them to move to higher energy levels. If this energy is high enough, they will leave the atom.

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.01.48

This phenomenon is the basis for solar power:

  • Light is incident on a solar panel
  • The electrons absorb energy from the photons causing them to leave their atom
  • This flow of electrons causes an electric field, which is converted into electricity

Solar energy can also be used in something called a solar thermal system to warm domestic hot water.

Wind Power

Wind pushes a turbine, converting its kinetic energy into the mechanical energy of the spinning turbine. We can then use this energy to pump water or to turn a generator, which converts this mechanical energy into electricity.

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.02.00

Biomass

Biomass is organic material stored in plants caused by the photosynthesis of light. This biomass has stored energy, which can be released by combustion. One of the issues with this is that the use of trees and other plant material causes deforestation.

On the other hand, by using substances such as animal manure, waste food and waste wood chippings, we are not chopping down living plants and therefore not contributing to deforestation. At the same time, by switching from coal to biomass we are reducing the net carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere, which causes the greenhouse effect.

Hydroelectric Power

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.02.24

The most common type of hydroelectric power uses a dam to store water in a reservoir.

The dam releases the water through a turbine, converting the gravitational potential energy of the water to the kinetic energy of the turbine. This is then connected to a generator, creating electricity.

Photo by Quintin Gellar from Pexels

Geothermal Power

Geothermal energy is the thermal energy contained within the Earth’s surface.

  • Water is pumped down to hot regions below the Earth’s strata,
  • The water is heated and turns into steam
  • The steam rises, drives a turbine, which drives a generator -> generating electricity.

Geothermal energy is a very important resource in volcanically active places such as Iceland.

Sources

  1. http://www.altenergy.org/renewables/renewables.html
  2. https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/?page=biomass_home
  3. http://www.darvill.clara.net/altenerg/geothermal.htm

Lesson Plan 5: Extreme Survivors

We are now halfway through the lesson plans of the Expedition 8848 Education Programme! These lesson plans have been made for teachers, educators and scout leaders to use in their classrooms to teach students about climate change and exploration.

The fifth lesson plan is about animals who have adapted to live in extreme environments like the high altitudes of the Himalayas.

The lesson plan 5 – Extreme Survivors can be downloaded here: http://expedition8848.com/lesson-plans/05-MW-LessonP5.pdf

Click here to access all the lesson plans: http://expedition8848.com

Click here to access more resources for this lesson and all the lesson plans on OneNote: https://1drv.ms/o/s!AvIvIB5FrRB2rmQQsl_tJ87xwOvk

Lonely Planet Kids: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/kids/

LP-Kids-Logo_2019

The First Expedition

By George Manley – Expedition 8848 Artist

Everest Historical Moments Series

1 lets take a look

1921 saw the first expedition to Everest, it was only reconnaissance trip, to see if it was possible to climb Everest. Very little was known and understood about Everest, the environment, the altitude and the equipment and clothing needed for such a huge undertaking. 

Because of World War One, many of the best mountaineers of the time had been lost, the average age of this first team was in the 40s, this was George Mallory’s first visit to Everest and he was the youngest team member. 

It was soon discovered that trying to climb Everest in the summer, the monsoon period was not the best time, in spite of this George Mallory reached the North Col at 7000m/23,000ft and first looked into the Western Cwm.