Lesson Plan 2: The Third Pole

Welcome to the Expedition 8848 Education Programme! These lesson plans have been made for teachers, educators and scout leaders to use in their classrooms to teach students about climate change and exploration.

The second lesson plan is about the impact of climate change on ‘the third pole’ and the impact of melting polar ice caps. See the video below for more information and feel free to show the video in your classroom as an introduction to the lesson.

The lesson plan 2 – The Third Pole can be downloaded here: http://expedition8848.com/lesson-plans/02-MW-lessonP2.pdf

Click here to access all the lesson plans: http://expedition8848.com

Lonely Planet Kids: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/kids/

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What is Climate Change?

Climate Science Series

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By now you have probably heard the terms climate change and global warming thrown around and heard from people who are adamant they are happening and those who are adamant that they aren’t. However, what do these terms really mean? How do we know if they are happening or not? In these journals, we are going to explain all the jargon surrounding this topic and hopefully make the subject much clearer. We’ll also let you know what you can do to fight climate change because every individual’s contribution can make a difference.

Global Warming

The term global warming refers simply to the warming of the Earth over the past century. Since the early 20th century the average temperature of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere has increased. This temperature is calculated by measuring the temperature across the entire globe during the year so seasonal changes and differences between local climates do not affect the results.

The results show unequivocally that the Earth is heating up. Although it may not always seem like it. The term global warming makes us picture warmer summers, more sunshine and less harsh winters. However, the effects of a heating planet are not as pleasant as it may seem.

Climate Change

The other term you hear floating around is climate change. This is often used interchangeably with the term global warming but in fact, there are subtle differences between the two.

While global warming refers purely to the heating of the Earth, climate change refers to the many changes in the climate that occur as a result of the heating of the Earth. This can be an increase in rainfall, more frequent extreme weather events, melting polar ice caps and many other impacts on the Earth’s climate.

The term climate on its own refers to the weather patterns of a particular location. For example, the Sahara desert has a very dry and hot climate and the climate of the UK is wet and moderate. Over the past few decades, we have noticed more extreme weather events such as hurricanes, smaller polar ice caps and shifts in the blooming of plants and flowers. These events are all due purely to the increase in Earth’s average temperature.

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Graph showing the increase in CO2 levels since the industrial revolution. Credit NASA and Vostok ice core data/J.R. Petit et al.; NOAA Mauna Loa CO2 record

The Greenhouse Effect

Why is the Earth’s temperature rising?  And how do we know that we are responsible for it?

The Earth’s atmosphere is responsible for controlling the temperature of the Earth and at the Earth’s surface. The atmosphere contains many gases which warm up the Earth in a process known as the greenhouse effect. If you have ever been inside a greenhouse you’ll know that inside it is much warmer than outside. This is because the glass is able to allow sunlight to pass into the greenhouse but traps the heat from the sun inside, warming up the plants.

The Earth’s atmosphere acts in a similar way. Light from the sun passes through the atmosphere and the heat generated radiates from the Earth’s surface. The gases in the Earth’s atmosphere trap this heat and reflect it back to Earth, thereby increasing the global temperature. The gases that cause this effect are known as greenhouse gases.

Without this phenomenon, the Earth would be too cold to be habitable. However, the effect is causing dramatic changes in climate that we are noticing today.

Greenhouse Gases

The major contributors to the greenhouse effect are water vapour, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, nitrous oxide and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Water vapour, CO2 and Methane are naturally present in the atmosphere whereas the presence of nitrous oxide and CFCs in the atmosphere are entirely due to human activity.

The reason that climate scientists believe that human activity is causing climate change is that the quantity of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has increased over the past few decades. In particular, the proportion of CO2 has increased due to the emission of CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels and to a lesser extent – deforestation.

Summary

What we hope this article shows is that climate change is a real and measurable phenomenon that is irrefutable. Over the next few days, we will explain in more detail the evidence for man-made climate change and what can be done to stop it.

Next up: The Effects of Climate Change

Sources

  1. Image – Earth from Space – credit NASA; http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/09/05/4080293.htm
  2. https://climate.nasa.gov
  3. https://www.wwf.org.uk/climate-change-and-global-warming
  4. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/global-warming-overview/
  5. https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-24021772

Lesson Plan 1: Training For The Top

Welcome to the Expedition 8848 Education Programme! These lesson plans have been made for teachers, educators and scout leaders to use in their classrooms to teach students about climate change and exploration.

The first lesson plan is about planning for a climb of Mount Everest. See the video below for more information and feel free to show the video in your classroom as an introduction to the lesson.

The lesson plan 1 – Training For The Top can be downloaded here: http://expedition8848.com/lesson-plans/01-MW-lessonP1.pdf

Click here to access all the lesson plans: http://expedition8848.com

Lonely Planet Kids: https://www.lonelyplanet.com/kids/

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Search for the World’s Highest Mountain

By George Manley – Expedition 8848 Artist

Everest Historical Moments

3 Because it is there

In 1808, Great Britain began the great survey of India, this was the task of mapping the whole of India and Nepal.

In 1856 it was discovered by calculating the heights and distances of all the known places, that Everest, then called peak 15, was the highest mountain in the world at a height of 8839m/29’002ft, only 9m/26ft different from today’s accurate height of 8848/29’028ft. An amazing feat considering this survey took place over 100 miles away because Nepal was closed off to outside visitors at that time.

 

 

 

Phase 1 of 4

Four weeks ago I took a Jeep ride from Kathmandu to Pablo which is a 3 day walk south of the Lukla airport. I have documented the trip as much as possible and at times I have really had to dig deep to get through the days. The result is I feel pretty much ok. I’m now sitting back in Lukla awaiting some of our guys to come in over the next 2 days. It will be nice to see some familiar faces so I can at least say hello before they head off for their own preparation.

In my head things seem pretty straight forward for the next two months but if there is anybody out there who is following this ( I know my dogs are so that’s two at least) then here is a basic breakdown. I see this 3 months of time spent in the Himalayas split into 4 phases.

Phase One

My own personal training based around my own understanding on how fit I need to be to climb to camp one on the first Everest approach. Meaning, if I can reach there ok then my fitness will slowly continue to improve. My general expedition fitness is usually for Polar work so fat is required – however for this I needed to drop weight and work as high as possible which is around 5550m with out needing a climbing permit. Anyway, this phase is now over and I am pleased with how I feel – my concern was I would do too much and literally Peak to soon – but I still have reserves.

Phase Two

On the 5 April what I am calling the education team are coming out to Lukla. Over 14 days we will trek to Everest Base Camp and back along with kick starting the education programme. I won’t go into details as it will all unfold over the two weeks but you will see all of what we do on Facebook / Instagram and on the Podcasts.

Phase Three

This is the ascent of Everest itself. I will be continuing the education programme and the education team in the UK will be adding to the content as we go along. In 2013 when we attempted Everest we ran a full programme to the summit and it was too much to do so this time I am spreading out the programme itself so I can focus on trying to reach the summit.

Phase Four

This is the most important phase. I or should I say we aim to come home safely. I know my two dogs will be happy about that…woof!

Note: all International Scouts and schools involved with the 8848 Expedition- when I arrive home the education programme doesn’t stop and we have a surprise announcement at the summit of Everest so like me – remain focused.